Oregon King Tide Photo Project
November, December, 2012 and January 2013


Oregon King Tide ProjectGrab Your Camera!

Every year in early winter, high tides in Oregon are higher than usual. These tides, which include what are called ‘king tides’ in some places, are being documented to help understand the impacts of sea levels rise in the coming decades. You are invited to participate in a project to document these high tides, which can be used to illustrate where tide levels are expected to occur with increasing frequency in the future. We encourage you to take pictures of this season’s king tides, which are predicted to occur on November 12-15th, 2012, December 12-14th, 2012 and January 10-12th, 2013 and then upload your photographs to our Flickr group. The more people participate, the better we will be able to document the highest extent of tidewater during the 2012-2013 winter king tides.

Alsea
Photo Credit: McKenzie Reeves Photography, 2011

** Click here to download the 2012 king tide poster! **

  • What is the King Tide Photo Project?

In early 2009, scientists in Australia expected to experience what was to be their highest King tide in over 18 years. They organized a photo event to document the effect of the tide on low-lying areas and received more than 2,000 photographs. In 2010, British Columbia and Washington both began to document their king tides, and in 2011 Oregon and San Francisco Bay joined in the fun. In 2012 the King Tide phenomena spread to the east coast. You can see Oregon’s 2011-2012 king tide photos at the Flickr website Oregon’s King Tide Initiative Flickr group.

 

 

  • Why Participate in the King Tide Photo Project?
stairs
Photo Credit: McKenzie Reeves Photography, 2011

Sea level is predicted to rise over the next century. Several areas of the Oregon coast are already vulnerable to high water levels because of to their low elevations and proximity to the shore line. Rising sea levels means that areas inundated by today’s highest tides are expected to be inundated more frequently in the future. What is an infrequent event today will become normal in the future. Understanding and documenting the extent of especially high tide events is becoming a popular way to highlight the need to prepare for the effects of future climate conditions. The King Tide photo project will generate information that can be used by coastal communities to develop plans to reduce vulnerability to rising sea levels. This is where you can help.

highwater
Photo Credit: mruwaldt, 2011

 

 

 

  • How Might your Photos be Used?
  • By submitting photos to the “Oregon King Tide Photo Initiative,” either via Flick or email, please consider granting permission for them to be used according to the "Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License." This means your photography maybe used in presentations, publications, and websites. Your pictures may also be used by state and local government research and planning purposes


  • How to Participate

1) Choose a site to photograph

2) Pick a day and time to photograph high water levels

3) Take the photographs

4) Upload your photos to Oregon’s King Tide Flickr site

 

 

1) Choose a site

highwater
Photo Credit: Raincoast789, 2011

Eventually, the King Tide photo project wants to get photographs of the highest tides along accessible shorelines around all of Oregon’s estuaries. The most important places to photograph are low-lying areas next to the shore. This might be low-lying roads, sidewalks, parking lots, or wetlands. In particular, it would be great to get photographs of places at the upper end of sloughs and on rivers and streams near the head of tide. What’s most important is to get a photograph of the water level against something, so that a person can go back at a later date and identify the high tide level in the photograph. "Before and after" pictures showing typical high tide and the extreme high water levels for the same location would be particularly useful.

 

 

January 19th - 20th2) Pick the day and time

Once you have selected the locations where you want to photograph high water levels, check the tide predictions in your area for one of the king tides. This season, high tides and king tides are predicted to occur from November 13-15th, 2012, December 12-14th, 2012, and January 10-12th, 2013. Make sure to factor in local knowledge about time differences between predicted tides and high tides at your selected photo location. You can use the table below as a starting point to plan you outing. For complete Oregon tide predictions from NOAA, go to NOAA’s tide predictions website for Oregon. Remember that it can take up to an hour or more for a high tide to travel from the mouth of a bay or slough—the usual location of tide gauges—to the location of the head of tide. Factor in the time it takes for both you and the high tide to arrive at about the same place at about the same time.

 

Grab your camera3) Take the photographs

The best photographs of high tides will show tide levels and areas that are inundated, in particular areas where water levels can be gauged against sea walls, jetties, bridge supports, dikes, buildings, roads, or other infrastructure or features. When you take your picture make note of the location, date, the time of day, and the direction you are facing as you take the picture. Data from a GPS data can be particularly valuable.

 

4) Need Some Examples?

Need some examples? Here are a few photos and why they are helpful.

Information needed to make your pictures a valuable part of this photo record:

• Take photos that show inundated areas around infrastructure.
• If possible, take two photos of the same spot, standing in the same place. One at the king tide. The other, for comparison purposes, at a typical high tide.
• Make sure to include the following information:

1. date, including year
2. time
3. location (pin on the Flickr map)
4. photo orientation

5) Upload the photos to our Flickr site

Flickr logoShare your photographs of this season’s highest tides through Oregon’s King Tide Initiative Flickr group.

Watch our video on how to upload photos to our Flickr group below:




The Oregon King Tide Photo Project is endorsed by the Coastwatch program of Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition and
the Surfrider Foundation. Thank you for your support!

Logos


King Tide times for January 2013
along the Oregon Coast

Locations are listed from the Columbia River south down to Brookings.
The bold type face indicates the predicted highest tide in the series.

Location
Jan. 10th
King Tide
Jan. 11th
King Tide
Jan. 12th
King Tide
Predicted
Highest Tide (feet)
Knappa
11:59 AM
12:53 PM
1:45 PM
10.0
Astoria Port Docks
11:22 AM
12:16 P M
1:08 PM
9.8
Young's Bay
11:17 AM
12:11 PM
1:03 PM
10.4
Warrenton
11:17 AM
12:11 PM
1:03 PM
10.2
Seaside
10:20 AM
11:12 AM
12:03 PM
7.0
Brighton
10:24 AM
11:16 AM
12:07 PM
9.7
Nehalem
10:50 AM
11:42 AM
12:33 PM
8.9
Barview
10:15 AM
11:07 AM
11:58 AM
9.3
Garibaldi
10:55 AM
11:50 AM
12:42 PM
9.7
Bay City
11:06 AM
11:58 AM
12:49 PM
8.8
Tillamook
11:25 AM
12:17 PM
1:08 PM
8.0
Netarts
10:50 AM
11:42 AM
12:33 PM
8.5
Nestucca mouth
10:28 AM
11:20 AM
12:11 PM
9.5
Taft
10:21 AM
11:13 AM
12:04 PM
8.1
Kernville
10:57 AM
11:49 AM
12:40 PM
7.4
Depoe Bay
10:08 AM
11:01 AM
11:51 AM
10.3
Yaquina Bar
10:07 AM
10:59 AM
11:50 AM
9.8
Newport
10:17 AM
11:09 AM
12:00 PM
10.0
Yaquina
10:28 AM
11:20 AM
12:11 PM
10.3
Winant
10:36 AM
11:28 AM
12:19 PM
10.3
Toledo
11:02 AM
11:54 AM
12:45 PM
10.1
South Beach
10:24 AM
11:17 AM
12:08 PM
10.3
Waldport
10:32 AM
11:25 AM
12:16 PM
9.5
Siuslaw mouth
10:05 AM
10:58 AM
11:49 AM
9.1
Florence
11:55 AM
11:48 AM
12:39 PM
8.1
Umpqua mouth
10:16 AM
11:09 AM
12:00 PM
8.6
Gardiner
11:07 AM
12:00 PM
12:51 PM
8.3
Reedsport
11:22 AM
12:15 PM
1:06 PM
8.3
Charleston
10:11 AM
11:04 AM
11:55 AM
9.5
Empire
10:48 AM
11:41 AM
12:32 PM
8.1
Coos Bay
11:37 AM
12:30 PM
1:21 PM
9.1
Bandon
10:06 AM
10:59 AM
11:50 AM
8.7
Port Orford
9:46 AM
10:38 AM
11:29 AM
9.1
Wedderburn
9:42 AM
10:34 AM
11:25 AM
8.2
Brookings
9:34 AM
10:26 AM
11:17 AM
8.6

For complete Oregon tide predictions from NOAA,
go to NOAA’s tide predictions website for Oregon


Frequently Asked Questions

If you have additional questions, please send them to cinamon.moffett@state.or.us

1. What are king tides?

tidesTides are caused by the gravitational influence of the sun, the moon, and the earth on the earth’s oceans. When the orbits and alignment of the earth, moon and sun come into a particular relationship, the tidal range is at its greatest; low tides are especially low and high tides are especially high.

The term ‘king tide’ is used in Australia and in some Pacific Island nations and refers to tides that occur when the moon’s orbit comes closest to the earth, the earth orbit is closest to the sun, and the sun, moon and earth are in alignment thereby increasing its influence on the tides. The term is becoming commonly used in the United States. These tidal events are also known as perigean spring tides.

In Oregon, we are using the term ‘king tide’ to refer to the highest winter tides. These highest tides occur each winter when the earth is closest to the sun in its yearly orbit, and when the sun and moon are aligned so that their gravitational forces reinforce each other to have a particularly strong effect on the Earth’s tides.

For more information about tides, please visit http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/education.html

2. Why are some tides higher than what is predicted?

Local weather conditions during a high tide event can greatly influence the actual observed water levels. If low atmospheric pressure system or a winter storm coincides with a high tide, water levels could be measurably higher than the predicted level published in the NOAA tide tables. Predicted tides are for a specific point along the coast or estuary. Tide levels in nearby locations will probably be different from predicted tides, because of a variety of factors. For example, the shape of bays and estuaries also can magnify the intensity of the local tides.

3. What is a perigean spring tide?

Adapted from http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/faq2.html#15

The moon is the primary source of the gravitational forces which cause the tides. The proximity of the moon to the earth affects the magnitude of a tide at any given time. In each of its 28-day elliptical orbits, the moon reaches a "perigee," which is the closest point of its elliptical orbit to the earth. There will be a slight increase in the range of tides at the perigee of the moon’s orbit, when the moon is closest to the earth. Increases in the range of the tides is seen by a higher than average high tide and a lower than average low tide. In addition, twice each month (around the new moon and full moon), when the sun, earth, and moon are nearly in line, there is an increase in the tidal range. Such tides are called "spring tides." When the occurrence of a new or full moon coincides with the "perigee" of the moon, it’s termed the "perigean spring tides".


The Oregon King Tide Photo Project is endorsed by Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition and the Surfrider Foundation